Spoon carving from a Bushcraft perspective with Jon Mac...
I am a spoon carver who lives and works on Dartmoor in Devon.
I carve spoons and Kuksa from green wood, using the three principal bushcraft tools. The knife, Axe and hook knife. I find spoon carving gives me a greater understanding of these tools as I can demonstrate a precision of craft in the finished spoon. I have developed my own spoon carving knife 'The MaChris' which is made by 'Chris Grant' a fantastically talented bladesmith.

Friday, 31 August 2012

Wilderness Gathering 10

My weekend at the Wilderness Gathering 'X' started with thick cloud and rain.

endicotts spoon carving first steps

I spent my time at the Wilderness Gathering with Kevin Endicott.
Kev needed help with his stock and putting the big old canvas 12x12 together.
We were there for four days overall. Kevin's stall was quickly filled with folk buying equipment which might keep the liquid sunshine at bay.
The weather soon took a turn for the better and we started dealing with a rush for sun hats and shorts.
Stuart and Emma were already well prepared.

endicotts spoon carving first steps

Kev had a bumper year sales wise and I managed to sit, carve and chat with some friends old and new.
Here's Paul from Bushcraft magazine, a very keen carver.

spoon carving jon mac

Jon Mac, Terry Longhurst ( Ilford East Activity Team ) and Ray Hutchinson ( Urban Bushcraft ) .

spoon carving first steps

Terry and Ray tracked me down during the weekend, they are both involved with the Scout movement here in the UK and are pro active in teaching the Scouts some advanced carving techniques.
Terry and some other chaps will be visiting us here in Devon soon for a carving brush up course, some good food and possibly a tipple or two.
Looking forward to it.
I also managed to have a good chin wag with Nic Westermann about some designs we are planning to produce.
More on that at a later date.

nic westermann spoon carving first steps

Kevin had a fine selection of equipment at the show.

endicotts spoon carving first steps

Even something that will  keep a fox dry and warm....

silver fox

I have a feeling that next time Sean the Silver Fox pays us a visit, he will spend his time sneaking up on me wearing his new jacket.
I also spent some quality time with Patrick McGlinchey who runs Backwood survival.

Patrick McGlinchey

Patrick is a very knowledgeable man who has spent many many years learning craft skills from indigenous folk around the world. He passes on his knowledge with passion and integrity.

Patrick McGlinchey

I sat with him for a couple of hours shooting the breeze. I wanted to know if he had an idea of what local materials I could use in the manufacture of an African mouth bow.
He gave me some information that I will experiment with as soon as I have some spare time.
Nice one Patrick, thank you and your great crew.

Now here's a guy I can't thank enough.
For years now I have been meaning to replace my modern nylon over the shoulder knife belt. There is probably a name for this type of belt but I can't for the life of me think what it is.

tibor

I asked Tibor, who owns Tibor leather crafts, if he could make up a leather sash that would match my knife sheath, after some time he had made just the thing I was looking for.

spoon carving first steps

I have used it for a couple of weeks now, very comfortable and much better than my old belt.

spoon carving first steps

Now, for those of you interested in old school equipment I would like to mention that Endicotts has managed to stock up on a good amount of first class Polish poncho/Lavvu.
These ponchos are made of good quality O/G canvas material.
Here is our friend Michaela sporting one of the ponchos....

spoon carving first steps

They have button closure arm holes.


And are just the job for keeping the draught at bay on a chilly night round the camp fire.

lavvu spoon carving first steps

 Here's the best bit though....

lavvu spoon carving first steps

Button two together and you have a spacious two person Lavvu.

spoon carving first steps

I stand at 6 foot 4 inches and I can easily lay down inside and get comfy.
I'll definitely be using mine in the cooling coming months.
The best bit about the whole event, in my opinion, was catching up with JJJ, a superb carver, tool maker and friend...

kuksa John Arthur

He had a busy time of it carving and making new edge tools.

kuksa John Arthur

Well, my thanks go to all who made this event such an interesting time for me, and to Roger Harrington who organised the Wilderness Gathering.
I'll be back...
J.

6 comments:

  1. Great post as always Jon. Love to see all of your pictures in your posts. That belt is called a baldric I think. Glad you got a chance to visit.

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  2. You have solved the puzzle Tom. It is in fact a Baldric. Did you ever watch 'Black Adder' on the television ?

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  3. I have! But that was Baldrick, right? :)

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    1. You're right there Tom, different spelling, same meaning. English in evolution...J

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  4. Hi Jon, I enjoy looking at your blog - thanks for it. Just out of interest, does your carving friend 'JJJ' have a blog or website where I can have a better look at what appears to be amazing wood work? Thanks Richard

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    1. Not at the moment Richard. I will give you a heads up if and when there is a development.... Cheers for now...J

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