Spoon carving.

Spoon carving with Jon Mac.
A blog following my journey in the world of bushcraft, spoon carving and kuksa carving. Home of the JonMac MiniMac carving knife.

Sunday, 20 February 2011

It certainly is a 'WORKSHOP HEAVEN'...

My great friend Matthew Platt from WORKSHOP HEAVEN sent me a box of goodies the other week. The package contained a new set of Japanese water stones. Just as well, as my old ones have seen better days. My stones see a lot of work and it was great to remove a brand new Ice Bear double sided stone from it's pristine box. Along with the 1200/8000 grit water stone there was an Nagura stone, vital for making a super fine slurry for polishing your razor sharp edge.

spoon carving

I use water stones because my knives will never smell oily or taint the work I am producing, and my knives are incredibly sharp after using one. I was so pleased, a knife is only as good as the stone you sharpen with...And in my opinion these are the best...

spoon carving

This is the 1200 grit side...

spoon carving

And the 8000 grit side....

spoon carving

Complete with Nagura stone...

spoon carving

I could not resist giving one of my MaChris carving knives a quick edge...

spoon carving

I keep my water stones in a plastic sealed container along with the Nagura stone and a scouring pad for cleaning the stones and wiping the blade. The scouring pad/sponge is also used for adding water to the stone during the sharpening process...

spoon carving

Here is the box sealed...

spoon carving

First the stone is soaked, and then the knife gets a few swipes on the course side...

spoon carving

A quick wipe with the sponge and then turn the stone over for a good polish...

spoon carving

Rub the Nagura stone on the fine side 8000 grit...

spoon carving

You can see the resultant slurry...

spoon carving

Once finished with the slurry paste, give the stone a wipe with the sponge...

spoon carving
Add water and complete your final polish. The result is a super sharp blade ready for a run through some good wood...

spoon carving

Here are some movies of the Japanese water stones in use...











And an idea for bushcrafty out door folk...
Matthew also sent me some space age sharpening film...

spoon carving

It is a sticky backed film that would be useful for sharpening your edge tools when lightweight traveling. I wanted to test it, so I cut some stainless steel sheet that I had in my workshop. I guess you can choose what backing to use, a flat aluminium sheet would be good as your blade wouldn't be damaged by a mishap, or perhaps a piece of nylon chopping board. Any way, I cut a strip and drilled some holes for a piece of wire to fit through so as to hold down the sheet...

spoon carving

I stuck a different sheet to each side...

spoon carving
 The sheets are super fine and I was able to put a good polish on one of my old knives...


spoon carving

I can not vouch for the durability of the film as yet, but I will be testing this system when out and about. The sheets are very cheap to purchase and I could see a benefit in experimenting with this idea for lightweight backpacking adventures...

spoon carving

Matthew also has some great little stones all ready to go from the box...

spoon carving

A super little diamond whetstone...

spoon carving

I think these would be great for owners of compound ground knives...

spoon carving

I can highly recommend these Ice Bear stones. I have been using them for five years or so and I always have a little grin on my face after I have sharpened one of my treasured knives...



ENJOY...J

4 comments:

  1. I can't even imagine an 8000 grit.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm with Gorges on that, 8000 grit, must be akin to using a leather strop?

    ReplyDelete
  3. There is a difference between U.S and Japanese grit sizes. If you halve the Japanese number you get the U.S equivalent I believe. However, run your finger down the 8000 grit stone and it is as smooth as good quality print paper. Using this size grit gives you the opportunity to highly polish the bevels, reducing friction when cutting and carving. The resultant finish is a razor sharp knife...J

    ReplyDelete
  4. Here is a link to a page giving a comparison between Japanese Industrial Standard and U.S grit sizes... http://www.knifeforums.com/uploads/1136458983-GritMicronJIS.gif ...J

    ReplyDelete